Reflection along that line is -x (x, y) (x, the y) when reflected transforms into (-y, (-x,). The vertices in this reflected triangle would be: A’ (-2, -1), C’ (1, -4), and then C’ (3, -2). What is an actual reflection? Which are the guidelines of reflections? A prime example would be looking in the mirror, and seeing your image mirroring back to your face.1 Reflection across the x-axis (x, (x,) when reflected transforms into (x, (x,).

Some other examples are reflections on water and glass surfaces. Reflection across the y-axis (x, the y) when reflected transforms into (-x, the y). Reflection along that line is x + (x, the value of) when it is reflected transforms into (y, the x).1 What are the requirements for learning and understanding trigonometry? Reflection along that line is -x (x, y) (x, the y) when reflected transforms into (-y, (-x,). I am at an area in programming that I have to design basic shapes, but I cannot do since my math skills are not very good. What is an actual reflection?1

After discovering that the required skills are trigonometry, I read several books. A prime example would be looking in the mirror, and seeing your image mirroring back to your face. It was clear that I could not comprehend the meaning of a word. Some other examples are reflections on water and glass surfaces.1 What are the prerequisites to comprehend basic 2D and 3D trigonometry? Calculus?

Algebra? What is the average time will it take the average person to master the subject. It would be wonderful to have an instruction guide for someone who is only familiar with adding division, multiplication, and substracting.1 Need to learn and understand trigonometry? The $begingroup$ is usually a complete understanding of algebra is required. I’m at the point where I must create basic shapes that I cannot because my math abilities are not great. It is taught together with advanced algebra, in a course called precalculus in the majority of high schools.1

When I realized that the necessary skills are trigonometry, I consulted some books. It is taught in the United States, at least. $\endgroup$ It was clear that I was unable to comprehend every word. BegingroupBeginning Group "Thorough comprehension of algebra" is an exaggeration. What is needed to grasp the basics of 2D and 3D trigonometry?1 Calculus?

Algebra? In general, how long is it going to take for an average person to master the subject. A person with only some pretty basic algebra who understands what proofs are can learn how to show that $\sin(\alpha+\beta)=\sin\alpha\cos\beta+\cos\alpha\sin\beta$ or how to tell what the graphs of trigonometric functions look like or how to solve triangles or how to derive things like the identity for the tangent of a sum from the identity for the sine of a sum, etc. $<>\qquad<>$ $\endgroup$ It would be fantastic for you to provide me with an example to someone like me who knows only adding division, multiplication and substracting. $begingroup$ @MichaelHardy True however, by thorough I meant you shouldn’t be insecure about the ability to alter equations using letters, and sometimes even multiple letters.1 A solid knowledge of algebra is required. If you’re having trouble with this fundamental foundation of algebra one and two, then you’re probably likely to face a very difficult time with trigonometry. $\endgroup$ It is taught, alongside advanced algebra in a precalculus class in the majority of high schools. $begingroup$ + 1 for the question. @user57404 : Geometry is absent from your post. $<>\qquad<>$ $\endgroup$ The United States, at least. $\endgroup$ "$begingroup$ @MichaelHardy True Geometry is essential too.1

The $begingroupStartgroup $ "Thorough knowledge of algebra" is an exaggeration. However, the majority of geometry is focused on nothing but triangles, which aren’t of great help, and not nearly the same as math is. A person with only some pretty basic algebra who understands what proofs are can learn how to show that $\sin(\alpha+\beta)=\sin\alpha\cos\beta+\cos\alpha\sin\beta$ or how to tell what the graphs of trigonometric functions look like or how to solve triangles or how to derive things like the identity for the tangent of a sum from the identity for the sine of a sum, etc. $<>\qquad<>$ $\endgroup$ That’s my personal opinion. $\endgroup$ "$begingroup$" @Michael Hardy However, by thorough, I was referring to the fact that you should not be uneasy about the ability to work that contain letters, or even more letters. 2 answers 2.1 If you’re struggling in this area one, which is the base of algebra 1 that you’re will have a very difficult time with trigonometry. $\endgroup$ There is no need for calculus. The $begingroup$ is +1 to the question. @user57404 : Geometry was missing from the reply. $<>\qquad<>$ $\endgroup$ It is necessary to learn some basic algebra. "$begingroup$" @Michael Hardy that geometry is crucial also.1 There are some things in the basic geometry you should demonstrate that you are fully aware of: However, most geometry is focused on triangles.

The value $pi$ represents the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of the circle. This isn’t an any great benefit, not nearly in the way that algebra is.1 For instance, a circle with a diameter of $1$ feet has a circumference of $pi$ feet, i.e. approximately $3.14159\ldotsdollars. It’s just my view. $\endgroup$ The $2pi$ represents the ratio of the circumference to the radius which means that when the radius is $1$ foot (and consequently that the circumference is$ feet) then the circumference will be $2pi$ feet. 2 Responses 2.1 There are $90circ$ in straight angles and $180circ$ for straight angles. You don’t need calculus. The sum of all angles of each triangle is $180circ$.

You will require some elementary algebra. There are simple geometric arguments to explain why this is the case. There are a few aspects in fundamental geometry that you must need to be aware of: Learn to comprehend these arguments.1